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Dance/Industrial 2 Page 1/4 file:///C%7C/Web%20Sites/%7Bshort%20description%20of%20image%7D
Produced by East/West
No.Tracks 154
Playing Time 91:56
2 Audio CDs CD-ROM
Released 1993


This is volume 7 of the ProSamples range from East/West and is the follow up to Dance/Industrial 1. Likewise this volume has also been put together by David Frangioni and Rich Mendelson and just like the first comes complete with a floppy disk of MIDI files (if your buying/ordering the CD don't forget to check the format as there are Atari/PC and Mac versions of this disk).

This 2CD set is purely a percussion offering, of the "loop construction set" approach. Over the 2CD's there are 154 loops, each played in full at the beginning of each track and then followed with the individual elements of the loop. On the accompanying MIDI disk you get the MIDI data of the loop. The idea being that you load the loop into your sequencer, sample the individual sounds and map the sounds to the MIDI data. When you press play on your sequencer you should, all being well, have a loop that sounds like the one on the CD.

Well what's the point of that you may ask. Why not just sample the loop as a whole and away you go. Of course you can, but this construction approach increases the flexibility offered by this collection no end. If you sample the loop as a whole, your pretty much stuck with it as it stands. Want more reverb on the snare, not quite sure of the kick drum, well your kind of stuck. However if you have all of the individual sounds and MIDI data you can do what you want, change elements, change tempo, create variations and fills, pretty much anything you want. It certainly allows you to create original loops very easily, using the CD as a base.

The trade off for this though is variety, without all of the individual sounds you could have maybe 4 times the number of loops included within the collection. Instead you get 154. The user has to create the variety themselves by altering the base loops.

The CD comes with an good inlay card, 24 pages long, Every sample is listed with its track and index point, along with a BPM. The descriptions of the sounds are rather basic, "kick", "snare", "clap" etc. The loops themselves have no descriptions, just numbered. I feel the producers here have skipped rather, the first CD had a description of every loop and sound, it's a lot of effort but I'm sure users really appreciate this. There is some blurb in the intro about deliberately not including descriptions "so users won't be influenced". Well, I disagree, if I'm looking for industrial loops out of this collection for example, I'd like some help, even vague general categories are better than nothing.


 

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